WV Civil Rights Lawyer

Police Misconduct, Civil Rights Law

Search Warrants for Attorneys’ Offices is Troubling Trend

Recently there have been a number of cases of search warrants being executed on Attorneys’ offices for the purpose of gathering evidence against a client/target of investigation. One such case was detailed by Bobby Frederick at the SC Criminal Law Blog here on August 23, where attorney George Argie’s office was raided by the feds seeking information/evidence on one of his clients. Frederick correctly notes that the appropriate method of obtaining information from an attorney’s files is through subpoena, in which case the attorney gets a chance to raise the attorney-client privilege before a judge.

On July 31, Frederick posted about the search warrant that was issued in Frisco Texas on attorney Keith Gore’s office, where State officials were seeking items and letters written from his client to his client’s wife. Thankfully, criminal defense lawyers in Texas came out in numbers in opposition to this Gestapo-like tactic.

Frederick recently added an update to that case, citing Grits and Tex Parte Blog, noting that the judge who signed that search warrant has now been recused from hearing the capitol murder case.

It is sickening to see that there are prosecutors out there who would go between different judges to get an illegal search warrant of an attorney’s office. If that is legal, then I would like to see a mechanism put in place whereby the lawyers of criminal defendants can obtain their own search warrants to be executed on prosecutor’s office. Say, for instance, that you know a certain prosecutor has a video tape that would exculpate your client. He refuses to hand it over, or to even acknowledge it. You could get a search warrant and have your private investigator execute the warrant and look for the tape. Yeah right. That’ll be the day. The sad fact is, that prosecutors are perfectly willing and able to abuse their power and not only will many judges not stop them, some of them apparently will help. I’m just glad I don’t practice in Collin County Texas.

– John H. Bryan, West Virginia Attorney.

Advertisements

September 4, 2008 - Posted by | Conspiracy, Corruption, Judges, Prosecutors

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: