WV Criminal Lawyer

Police Misconduct, Civil Rights Law

New Summary of the Sawyer v. Asbury Opinion

I just went back through the Sawyer v. Asbury opinion in this post on the Use of Force Source.  If you have followed the case on this blog, it’s interesting to take a step back and analyze the Court’s ruling as it finds its place in Fourth Circuit excessive force case law.

April 9, 2014 Posted by | Civil Liability, Excessive Force, Governmental Liability, John H. Bryan, Judges, Juries, Lawsuits, Lawyers, Police, Police Misconduct, Trials | Leave a comment

Homeowner related shooting case

On the Use of Force Source, I just posted my write-up on a fairly recent Fourth Circuit case involving a homeowner who was shot by police while investigating a disturbance outside his home.  If you’re interested:

George Cooper, Sr. v. James Sheehan, et al.

I also recently posted a write-up on another recent Fourth Circuit opinion involving excessive force and bystander liability (e.g., where a group of officers allegedly beat someone and the victim doesn’t know who did what):

Marquis L. Stevenson v. City of Seat Pleasant, Maryland.

April 2, 2014 Posted by | Civil Liability, Excessive Force, Lawsuits, Police, Police Misconduct | Leave a comment

New Online Resource for Use of Force law

I started a new website called “Use of Force Source” at UseofForceSource.com.  The purpose is to establish an online resource to discuss and compile Fourth Circuit federal case law, and U.S. Supreme Court case law on the use of physical force – both police situations and self defense situations.  I have already listed a bunch of black letter law on excessive force in the Fourth Circuit (so Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, North Carolina and South Carolina).  It will be a blog format, and will be specific to use of force cases.  My intention is to post about specific cases, going over the facts, as well as the law.  I also like to listen to the oral argument audio since it gives you much more insight into the case and the reasoning behind the Court’s decisions.

I already posted my first post today, discussing the November of 2013 Fourth Circuit opinion from Ayala v. Wolfe, which was a police shooting case.

March 20, 2014 Posted by | Appeals, Civil Liability, Concealed Weapons, Excessive Force, John H. Bryan, Lawyers, Police, Police Misconduct, Self Defense | Leave a comment

Matthew Cole federal lawsuit settled

For those of you who like to follow cases and not just read headlines about the allegations, I wanted to provide an update on the Matthew Cole case.  It was recently settled, having just been finalized yesterday.  It was originally filed in December 13, 2012.  That is about average from filing to settlement/trial.  It was scheduled to go to trial on March 13, 2014.

All discovery had been completed, including many depositions.  And all dispositive motions, and pretrial motions, had been briefed.  So anyone thinking that these are quick and easy cases to settle would be mistaken.  Most of these cases (and this one was certainly no exception) are hard-fought and highly contested.

March 6, 2014 Posted by | Civil Liability, Excessive Force, Governmental Liability, John H. Bryan, Lawsuits, Police, Police Misconduct | Leave a comment

Federal civil rights lawsuit filed out of Mercer County, WV, alleging denial of medical care for an epilepsy victim

View this document on Scribd

January 31, 2014 Posted by | Civil Liability, Denial of Medical Care, Excessive Force, Governmental Liability, John H. Bryan, Lawyers, Police, Police Misconduct | Leave a comment

West Virginia Lawyer Charged in Relation to Shooting

Apparently a West Virginia lawyer was charged with being an accessory after-the-fact in relation to a New Year’s Eve shooting in Charleston, which is a felony.  This was reported by WCHS, as well as the Charleston Gazette.  Allegedly, after his friend shot a guy after an argument over ordering a pizza, the lawyer took the guy’s cell phone and instructed him to run.  And then he was allegedly uncooperative with police when they asked him the identity of the shooter.

It was reported that all of this can be viewed on surveillance footage:

“Conrad is in trouble, because police said he can clearly be seen on surveillance video taking Underwood’s cell phone, which is considered evidence, from the scene and telling the suspect to run.”

So my initial thought is, how can you view what someone is saying on surveillance footage?  You can’t.  We pretty much know the footage does not contain audio – since that in itself would constitute felony illegal wiretapping in West Virginia, since it would be capturing conversations for which no party has consented.

The police are the first to complain about surveillance footage when they are accused of misconduct, noting that you can’t tell everything from the video.  Well you certainly cannot tell what someone is saying to another.  How does a video prove that the lawyer was instructing the shooter to flee? And if you can view the cell phone being handed to the lawyer, how can you tell that the lawyer asked for it.  And if a cell phone is handed to you in such a situation, does that make you a felon?  What if you are a lawyer potentially representing the individual.  Can you preserve evidence yourself?  Are you compelled to turn over your own evidence to police at their demand?  The West Virginia Rules of Criminal Procedure don’t provide for that.  In fact, a criminal defendant is not compelled to provide discovery to the prosecution until and unless he or she requests discovery from the State.

As with any of the decaying “cities” in this country where you have arrogant and hypocritical leadership, the City of Charleston was quick to jump into attention-whore mode and to engage in their first attempts at poisoning the jury pool:

“It’s really surprising that someone in a position of authority, and all that he is responsible for, to participate in this criminal conduct,” Lt. Steve Cooper, with Charleston police said. 

. . .

Charleston Mayor Danny Jones said he plans to file an ethics complaint with the state bar, against Conrad.

What ever happened to “innocent until proven guilty”?  Is it ethical for a police officer, or mayor, to go onto TV and tell the public that an individual who has been charged, and who is presumed innocent, has committed criminal conduct?  Or that the individual has abused a position of authority?  Or that the person is unethical?

I’m not passing judgment on the lawyer’s actions one way or the other since I don’t know all of the facts.  After all, isn’t that what police say when one of their own are accused of misconduct?  Well, it’s under investigation and we don’t know all of the facts.  So what if he did take the guy’s cell phone and told him to run?  What negative consequences did that have?  Who is a victim to the lawyer’s alleged crime?  None and nobody.

January 3, 2014 Posted by | Concealed Weapons, Lawyers, Media Coverage, Police, Police Misconduct, Self Defense, Uncategorized, West Virginia Concealed Carry Laws, West Virginia Gun Laws | Leave a comment

WV Supreme Court Issues Opinion Regarding Police Internal Investigation Files

On November 26, the West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals issued a decision in a suit  filed by the Charleston Gazette (which I posted about back in November of 2010), to enforce a FOIA request initially sent by former Gazette police misconduct reporter Gary Harki.  After the circuit court refused to allow the internal files to be produced, the Gazette appealed and ended up winning at the Supreme Court.

The opinion is available in .pdf format on the Court’s website here.

Essentially the Court ruled that state police internal investigation documents are subject to production through FOIA requests, so long as the investigation has been concluded, and the allegations involve official misconduct about which the public has a right to know.  I’m summarizing.

This holding did not specifically address political subdivisions, i.e., counties and municipalities.  However, I don’t see any legitimate reason for treating them differently under this case law.

December 10, 2013 Posted by | FOIA, Media Coverage, Police, Police Misconduct, State Agencies | Leave a comment

Media Reports From The “Sadler” Excessive Force Lawsuit

On the filing of the lawsuit:

WV Record

News and Sentinel

WTAP

Charleston Gazette / AP

Prior to the filing of the lawsuit:

News and Sentinel

Charleston Gazette

WTAP

November 22, 2013 Posted by | Civil Liability, Excessive Force, Governmental Liability, John H. Bryan, Lawsuits, Media Coverage, Police, Police Misconduct | Leave a comment

I’m Back: Another Excessive Force 1983 Lawsuit Filed in Parkersburg, West Virginia

Well, I said I didn’t think I would be returning to Parkersburg.  But wouldn’t you know it, I’m headed back over there.  Here is yet another federal lawsuit filed by myself, and my co-counsel Paul Morrison, for yet another videotaped use of force out of Parkersburg, West Virginia.  This is my fourth time there.  This one was already in the news a few times.  With the closure of the federal courthouse in Parkersburg, this case will be litigated out of the federal courthouse in Charleston.  Maybe had we filed it a couple of days earlier . . . .

View this document on Scribd

November 20, 2013 Posted by | Civil Liability, Excessive Force, Governmental Liability, John H. Bryan, Lawsuits, Lawyers, Police, Police Misconduct | Leave a comment

Media Coverage of Pumphrey v. Harrison County Commission, et al.

WV Record:

Man says Harrison County Deputies broke orbital bones, ribs

Charleston Gazette:

Clarksburg man alleges police brutality from 2011 arrest

October 7, 2013 Posted by | Excessive Force, Governmental Liability, John H. Bryan, Lawsuits, Lawyers, Media Coverage, Police, Police Misconduct | Leave a comment

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